Toyo Tire outbreak: Health department says salmonella behind Toyo catering outbreak. At least 80 employees have been treated at emergency rooms; five have been hospitalized. From CDC: What is salmonella?

Toyo Tire outbreak: Health department says salmonella behind Toyo catering outbreak. At least 80 employees have been treated at emergency rooms; five have been hospitalized. From CDC: What is salmonella?

 

WEDNESDAY UPDATES

Salmonella the source of food-bourne illness at Toyo Tire event:

The Georgia Department of Public Health Northwest Health District has concluded that the cause of the food-borne illness outbreak related to a catered employee event at Toyo Tire in White on Nov. 14 and 15 was salmonella.  The determination is based on multiple positive lab-test results for salmonella from employees who attended the event.  There have been five hospitalizations because of the outbreak (Hometown Headlines now costs at least 80 treatment at area emergency rooms as well; see below).

The permitted Bartow County restaurant in Cartersville, Ga., that catered the event has voluntarily closed and will remained closed until the week of Nov. 27.  Employees of the restaurant have received rigorous training in safe food handling from Bartow County Health Department environmental health specialists.

The Northwest Health District and the Bartow County Health Department continue to work with Toyo Human Resources to gather and compile additional information about the outbreak directly from the approximately 1,800 employees who attended the event and potentially may have been exposed.

Symptoms of foodborne illness include upset stomach, stomach cramps,diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. See your doctor or healthcare provider if you have symptoms that are severe, including:

  • High fever (temperature over 101.5°F, measured orally)
  • Blood in stools
  • Frequent vomiting that prevents keeping liquids down (which can lead to dehydration)
  • Signs of dehydration, including a marked decrease in urination, a very dry mouth and throat, or feeling dizzy when standing up.
  • Diarrhea that lasts more than 3 days

If you are sick, practice frequent and thorough handwashing to prevent secondary fecal-oral disease transmission and disinfect commonly touched surfaces.  Preferably stay home and follow your employer’s sickness policy

At least 80 treated at area emergency rooms: As of Tuesday evening, the number of Toyo Tire patients treated at Cartersville Medical Center’s emergency department had reached 70. Two patients previously were admitted to the hospital following initial treatment. Coupled with at least 10 patients treated at the emergency room at Floyd Medical Center in Rome, that puts the total of those requiring urgent care following last week’s catered meal to more than 80 people. Others have been treated at Redmond Regional but a count is not available (see below).

This update from Redmond Regional Medical Center, Wednesday afternoon: “We have treated individuals in our ER for symptoms consistent with the reported food-borne illness outbreak. We are working with the Department of Public Health to identify and report to the DPH the cases of those individuals who were seen as a result of the reported event at Toyo Tire.”

About Angelo’s pizza and bistro: Five recent health inspections carry average score of 90.6 (an A-minus). Lawyer says owner fully cooperating with health officials in Toyo case. Click Angelo’s

From the CDC: What is salmonella?

We’ve added the following information about salmonella from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The report contains link to additional information.

What is Salmonella?

Salmonella is a bacteria that makes people sick. It was discovered by an American scientist named Dr. Salmon, and has been known to cause illness for over 125 years. The illness people get from a Salmonella infection is called salmonellosis.

Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps between 12 and 72 hours after infection. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most individuals recover without treatment. In some cases, diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. In these patients, the Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites. In these cases, Salmonella can cause death unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics. The elderly, infants, and those with impaired immune systems are more likely to have a severe illness1.

How Common is Salmonella Infection?

CDC estimates that approximately 1.2 million illnesses and approximately 450 deaths occur due to non-typhoidal Salmonella annually in the United States2. Read more key Salmonella statistics.

There are many different kinds of Salmonella bacteria. Salmonella serotype Typhimurium[PDF – 15 pages] and Salmonella serotype Enteritidis[PDF – 15 pages] are the most common in the United States3Salmonella infections are more common in the summer than winter. Learn more about Salmonella serotypes.

Who is at Highest Risk for Salmonella Infection?

Children are at the highest risk for Salmonella infection. Children under the age of 5[PDF – 36 pages] have higher rates of Salmonella infection than any other age group3. Young children, older adults, and people with weakened immune systems are the most likely to have severe infections4.

Are there Long-Term Consequences to a Salmonella Infection?

People with diarrhea due to a Salmonella infection usually recover completely, although it may be several months before their bowel habits are entirely normal. A small number of people with Salmonella develop pain in their joints. This is called reactive arthritis. Reactive arthritis can last for months or years and can lead to chronic arthritis, which can be difficult to treat1. Antibiotic treatment of the initial Salmonella infection does not make a difference in whether or not the person develops arthritis1. People with reactive arthritis can also develop irritation of the eyes and painful urination5.

TUESDAY UPDATES

Hometown Headlines Radio Edition featured an interview with the Health Department on Toyo case at 7:40 this morning on WRGA 98.8 FM. Tim Allee and Logan Boss discussed what steps have occurred so far. Among them:

  • The restaurant owner has voluntarily closed in Cartersville but could reopen by Wednesday. It is being inspected and sanitized to ensure there are no additional chances of outbreak.
  • The catered meals were served over two days and four shifts, which is why the potential exposure is 1,800 workers.
  • Health inspectors have a copy of the menu served those days and is surveying workers to learn exactly who ate what in an effort to narrow the search for the contaminant. One of the key factors: “Who consumed what product at what time,” says Allee.
  • Salmonella is not confirmed as the source of the outbreak. Tests are continued and the results might not be known until after the holiday.
  • It is “highly probable” it is a food-borne outbreak, says Allee.
  • Toyo confirms around 1,800 workers were served over the two-day period; that does not mean all of them will become sick, says Boss.

New: Floyd Medical Center has seen “about 10 patients experiencing similar symptoms to those being reported, says spokesman Dan Bevels.

New: Georgia Department of Public Health Northwest Health District and Bartow County Health Department environmental health specialists and epidemiologists continue to investigate a likely foodborne-illness outbreak related to a catered employee event at Toyo Tire in White last week.  The permitted food-service facility in Bartow County that catered the event has voluntarily closed pending mandatory safety-and-health actions. Although some news and social media reports have specified salmonella as the cause of the outbreak, that has not yet been confirmed. We may not have conclusive test results until the week of 11/27/17 due to the Thanksgiving holiday.  We are working with Toyo Human Resources to gather more information about the outbreak from their employees. If you are sick, practice frequent and thorough handwashing to prevent secondary fecal-oral disease transmission.  Disinfect commonly touched surfaces.  Preferably stay home and follow your employer’s work-sick policy.”

1,800 employees potentially exposed: That’s the current estimate from Public Health.

Cartersville Medical Center: More than 40 treated; two admitted: “According to our emergency department director, as of 5 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 20, we have treated more than 40 patients with symptoms including nausea, vomiting and diarrhea in our emergency department. At present, two have been admitted as inpatients. The two patients who were admitted to the hospital presented to our emergency department (Sunday).”

Other medical facilities: Awaiting updates from Redmond Regional Medical Center, Northside’s Cherokee hospital and Harbin Clinic.

What we’re hearing from the workers and their families: Many are being treated for salmonella and are in touch with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as well as the local health agencies.

From Toyo Tire: No comment as of 5:30 this morning from Toyo Tire. We have been in touch with the company’s corporate spokeswoman, Julie Sediq, who said on Monday afternoon that she’d referred our note to the local plant.

The restaurant: No comment from the Italian restaurant or its owner regarding the meal it catered for Toyo last week.

You knew this was coming: “There may be hundreds of people sickened who ate at a catered meal at Toyo Tire in White, Georgia, last week. Ryan Osterholm, a Salmonella lawyer at our law firm, has been contacted regarding this outbreak and is investigating a lawsuit against a restaurant that catered the event. He is one of the few lawyers in the U.S. who has won millions for people sickened by food contaminated with Salmonella bacteria.”

Social media: Responses on local Facebook pages is caustic to say the least. Those claiming to be employees or their families are critical of the restaurant as well as their employer. Read at your own risk.

From the health department:

Georgia Department of Public Health Northwest Health District and Bartow County Health Department environmental health specialists and epidemiologists continue to investigate a likely foodborne-illness outbreak related to a catered employee event at Toyo Tire in White last week.

Cause of the outbreak still has not been determined.  We may not have conclusive test results for three to five days, possibly longer, because of the Thanksgiving holiday.

We know of two hospitalizations in Bartow but there may have been more. We are working with Toyo HR to determine how many people potentially may have been affected and believe it is approximately 1,800.  We are also working with Toyo HR to gather more information about the outbreak from their employees.

The permitted food-service facility in Bartow County that catered the event has cooperated with Bartow County Health Department environmental health specialists investigating the outbreak.

Symptoms of foodborne illness include upset stomach, stomach cramps, diarrhea, vomiting, and fever.

See your doctor or healthcare provider if you have symptoms that are severe, including:

  • High fever (temperature over 101.5°F, measured orally)
  • Blood in stools
  • Frequent vomiting that prevents keeping liquids down (which can lead to dehydration)
  • Signs of dehydration, including a marked decrease in urination, a very dry mouth and throat, or feeling dizzy when standing up.
  • Diarrhea that lasts more than 3 days

FROM HOMETOWN:

About the caterer and Toyo: We’ve picked up a name from social media and continue to try to reach the restaurant and the owner for comment. We’ve called the restaurant but received no answer. We’ve tried Facebook as well. We also have emails into Toyo’s corporate office which have been relayed to the White office. We will post as we receive more.

PREVIOUS REPORT

Northwest Georgia Public Health is investigating reports of what some are calling a widespread case of food poisoning at the Toyo Tire campus in White outside of Cartersville.

“We are investigating a possible foodborne-illness outbreak related to a multiday catered event at this location last week.  There is no danger to the general public,” says Public Health spokesman Logan Boss. “Anyone experiencing symptoms of foodborne illness — such as stomach cramps, diarrhea or vomiting — should see their doctor.”

 

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